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These devotions are targeted specifically for you, the healthcare professional, and the challenges unique to you that you face on a day-to-day basis. You can sign-up here to receive these devotions through a weekly email or you can come back to this page to read the weekly devotion online. We hope you are encouraged and inspired by them, and that you can gain insight and wisdom from others who have gone through the same challenges that you face in the healthcare industry today.

"If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him" (James 1:5, KJV).

Photo: Pixabay

A Doctor’s Vacation III

By Al Weir, MD | September 15, 2021

“…‘Teacher, we know that you are a man of integrity. You aren’t swayed by others, because you pay no attention to who they are…’” (Mark 12:14, NIV).

My wife dropped me off at Panera so I could catch up on my medical email while on vacation. She decided to fill our car with gas while waiting for me to finish. Noting a beggar on the roadside and committed to giving as Jesus had commanded, she handed him $20 through the window. He struck up a conversation and learned that we lived in Tennessee. He mentioned how much he wanted to visit Nashville if his circumstances changed. After receiving the money and talking of Tennessee, the beggar asked my wife if he could pray for her, and he did so.

Photo: Pixabay

A Doctor’s Vacation II

By Al Weir, MD | September 7, 2021

Family vacations for doctors can be disorienting, at least for me. There is often a mental and emotional chasm separating the intensity and profundity of practice and the environment into which a vacation throws me.

Photo: Pixabay

A Doctor’s Vacation 1

By Al Weir, MD | August 31, 2021

Family vacations for doctors can be disorienting, at least for me. There is often a mental and emotional chasm separating the intensity and profundity of practice and the environment into which a vacation throws me.

An Ox in the Well

By Al Weir, MD | August 24, 2021

“For I am not ashamed of the gospel…” (Romans 1:16, NIV).

I walked into his room with five residents behind me on teaching rounds. We gathered around his bed, and I leaned over to ask of his symptoms. He reached up and touched the cross on my lapel. “I like that,” he said. “I am not depressed. I’m not sad. God is in control.” “I agree with you all the way,” I responded. “Whatever this is, God has you safe in His arms.” The house staff watched in silence.

A Moment on Rounds

By Al Weir, MD | August 17, 2021

“For I am not ashamed of the gospel…” (Romans 1:16, NIV).

I walked into his room with five residents behind me on teaching rounds. We gathered around his bed, and I leaned over to ask of his symptoms. He reached up and touched the cross on my lapel. “I like that,” he said. “I am not depressed. I’m not sad. God is in control.” “I agree with you all the way,” I responded. “Whatever this is, God has you safe in His arms.” The house staff watched in silence.

Be Careful

By Al Weir, MD | August 11, 2021

“For the eyes of the Lord are on the righteous and his ears are attentive to their prayer…” (1 Peter 3:12, NIV).

I called to tell him his cancer had continued to improve with immune therapy. He was certainly happy about that, and then he said, “You know, I asked God to put something on me to make me turnaround from the way I was living and set me right. Looks like He’s done that with this cancer. You gotta’ be careful what you pray for.”

Still Fixin’ Things

By Al Weir, MD | August 3, 2021

“And we all, who with unveiled faces contemplate the Lord’s glory, are being transformed into his image with ever-increasing glory, which comes from the Lord, who is the Spirit” (2 Corinthians 3:18, NIV).

He was doing well with his cancer, so we chatted about his life, “You know, I was just like those other fellows doing drugs and lying on the sidewalk outside the feeding center. One day when I didn’t do drugs, I went to the home of one of my church ladies and told her, ‘Do you know I do drugs?’ ‘You do drugs? You need to give it to Jesus. He’s still fixin’ things.’ And Jesus did, right there. I started praying and I felt this hand on my shoulder. I looked around and saw an image. Then I looked again, and it was gone. And my need for drugs was gone as well.”

Failure Matters

By Al Weir, MD | July 27, 2021

“But go, tell his disciples and Peter, ‘He is going ahead of you into Galilee. There you will see him, just as he told you’” (Mark 16:7, NIV).

I was driving back from a satellite clinic when her daughter called. “The ambulance is taking my mom to the emergency room. She’s really sick.” Before I reached the hospital, my patient died of septic shock. This wasn’t supposed to be. I had never seen a patient die with the treatment I had given her. Later that day I combed through the chart to see if I had made mistakes. I could find none, but I asked Risk Management to send the chart out for peer review. I loved this patient and her daughter. I know of nothing I did wrong, but somehow either the decision I had made to treat her, or the way in which it was carried it out, or the underlying disease itself was responsible for her death. Three days later, I am awake at night, grieving over her daughter’s great sadness.

Flipping the Ruler

By Al Weir, MD | July 20, 2021

“But many who are first will be last, and many who are last will be first” (Matthew 19:30, NIV).

Work and family have always been the time consumers in my life, thank God. So, when I chose a sport for health, I chose running. It was the one thing I could do at 5 in the morning and still get to work by 6:30 or 7, not knowing when my day would end. When I reached 53, I started running long distances. When I turned 70, I decided to run my last marathon, just to prove I could. Last week, just west of Chicago, I did so with my daughter as she ran her first. It was 20 degrees warmer than a marathon should be, and I was miserable the whole way, and slow. After I stumbled across the finish line—my daughter fresh and me a dishrag—I discovered I had run the fastest time of any man 70 or older and would get a medal. Later I discovered I also ran the slowest time of any man 70 or over, being the only man over 69 who had run. I was both first and last.

Rocks in Shoes

By Al Weir, MD | July 13, 2021

“And he said to all, ‘If anyone would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross daily and follow me’” (Luke 9:23, ESV).

He was thin, and one could tell his life had been hard. His wife had been murdered in 2012, and he had suffered multiple accidents with persistent pain from his injuries. He had no one in his life to help him, and now with advanced cancer he had come to me. After my evaluation and recommendations, I asked, “Do you have a church that might give you support?” “No church,” he said. “I don’t believe in God, or at least don’t know if He exists. If there was a God, you’d think He’d give me a break.” He paused, “I’ve really got nothing left to live for.” I held out my hand, “You’ve got one friend here to live for.” And I knew my hand required more than just being his doctor.

The Uncounted

By Al Weir, MD | July 6, 2021

“He [Paul] was accompanied by Sopater, son of Pyrrhus from Berea, Aristarchus and Secundus from Thessalonica, Gaius from Derbe, Timothy also, and Tychicus and Trophimus from the province of Asia” (Acts 20:4, NIV).

I wheeled him into the exam room myself, as he had no one else to help him. After my evaluation I noted his Vietnam veteran Marine cap. “You’re a hero to me for what you’ve done for our country,” I said. “I’m one of the lucky ones,” he replied. “Twelve of my buddies didn’t make it back. When they brought the Vietnam Memorial replica to town, I went out to find their names. Not one of them was listed. I asked what was going on, and they asked me when I had served in Nam. I told him ‘62 to ‘63. They explained that the list had only been started in ‘65. ‘It was not a war before then, only a conflict,’ they said. My buddies gave their lives for our country, and they were never even counted.”

Slate

By Al Weir, MD | June 29, 2021

“Suppose a brother or sister is without clothes and daily food. If one of you says to them, ‘Go in peace; keep warm and well fed,’ but does nothing about their physical needs, what good is it?” (James 2:16, NIV).

Doctors are really good diagnosticians, but not always at home. My wife is an incredible home manager and a servant to many people she loves, including outsiders in trouble. Last week she drove 400 miles to help my son and his wife pack up to move, then she returned with their 12-year-old dog, Slate. When they reached home, the dog developed severe polyuria and polydipsia—leading to incontinence, mopping and Lysol. Yesterday I came into the kitchen to find her crying. I diagnosed her tears as emotional strain caused by a woman she was helping in prison ministry, now multiplied by the huge work of caring for my son’s sick dog. I diagnosed, “I’m so sorry you are having to deal with Slate on top of everything else.” Wrong; she wasn’t crying for herself but for the dog’s suffering. I said, “It doesn’t help to cry.” For which I got the look. I then recovered, “It’s good that you love the dog enough to cry for him. Let’s do something about it.” We spent the rest of the day ordering a portable outdoor fence, tracking down a doghouse, picking up doggie diapers and setting up a vet visit for Monday. At the end of the day, my servant wife was tired, but her floors were dry, and her tears were gone.